Ramaphosa city hall

South Africa, Cape Town. City Hall, with the Grand Parade in the foreground. Image: Gallo Images

Ramaphosa saga: Phala Phala debate to be held at Cape Town City Hall – here’s what you need to know about the venue

Next week, the National Assembly will debate the Section 89 report in Cape Town City Hall. If the report is adopted, President Cyril Ramaphosa could face impeachment.

Ramaphosa city hall

South Africa, Cape Town. City Hall, with the Grand Parade in the foreground. Image: Gallo Images

Members of Parliament will meet at Cape Town City Hall on Tuesday, 13 December, to debate the Section 89 Independent Panel report. If the report, which made several damning findings against President Cyril Ramaphosa, is adopted, it will pave the way for an impeachment inquiry.

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DEBATE TO BE HELD AT CAPE TOWN CITY HALL

The debate was expected to be held on Tuesday, 6 December. However, late on Monday, the Chief Whips of the political parties represented in Parliament accepted a proposal from the ANC to delay the matter for a week.

As previously reported, the debate was delayed in order to make the logistical arrangements for a physical meeting of MPs.

READ: Ramaphosa saga: Phala Phala report debate postponed to 13 December

On Tuesday, the National Assembly convened for a Hybrid Plenary in the Good Hope Chamber and resolved to convene the debate at Cape Town City Hall next week.

President Ramaphosa delivered his State of the Nation Address at Cape Town City Hall at the start of the year. It was the first time the Address was given at a venue other than Parliament since 1994, after the National Assembly was destroyed in a fire at the start of the year.

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CORNERSTONE LAID IN 1905

The cornerstone of the building was laid on 29 August 1900 by Thomas Bell – the then-mayor of Cape Town – and it was opened to the public in 1905.

The building was designed by Johannesburg architects Reid and Green and fashioned after the Italian Renaissance style.

Most of the construction material, including fixtures and fittings, was imported from Europe. The golden oolithic limestone, which gives the hall its colour, also came from overseas.

 The Grand Hall on the ground floor can seat around 950 people, while the Minor Hall on the first floor and Banqueting Hall on the second can hold 184 and 226 people, respectively.

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