MisuZulu

KZN schools and the department of education celebrated King MisuZulu ka Zwelithini by wearing beautiful traditional regalia on 30 August. Images via Twitter @dbe_kzn @mfoka_jobe

Bayede! KZN schools honour King MisuZulu despite uproar [watch]

KZN schools and the department of education celebrated King MisuZulu kaZwelithini by wearing beautiful traditional regalia on 30 August.

MisuZulu

KZN schools and the department of education celebrated King MisuZulu ka Zwelithini by wearing beautiful traditional regalia on 30 August. Images via Twitter @dbe_kzn @mfoka_jobe

Tuesday 30 August is Traditional School Day in KwaZulu-Natal, which is a day set aside to honour newly crowned Zulu king MisuZulu kaZwelithini.

Following the king’s ukungena esibayeni ceremony (entering the kraal) on 20 August, KwaZulu-Natal Education MEC Mbali Frazer encouraged pupils, teachers and non-teaching staff in the province to wear traditional attire to celebrate the AmaZulu king.

Frazer’s call was not welcomed by the South African Democratic Teachers’ Union (Sadtu) in KwaZulu-Natal, which said that wearing traditional attire contradicted the South African Schools Act. However, this did not stop learners, teachers and the department of education from paying tribute to the king.

KZN SCHOOLS CELEBRATE KING MISUZULU

MEC Frazer and Prince Thulani Zulu, who were clad in Zulu traditional attaire, visited Nqabakazulu High School in KwaMashu’s P section, Durban, in honour of the full ascendancy of King MisuZulu kaZwelithini.

A video of them singing an IsiZulu traditional song with the learners and teachers at the school was shared on Twitter by IOL journalist, Sihle Mavuso.

More videos were shared by the Department of Basic Education in KwaZulu-Natal on Twitter.

Mjindi High School located in UMkhanyakude District also participated in the Zulu King Coronation Cultural Activity, as well as Ikhandlela Secondary School, Esikhaleni in the King Cetshwayo District. In addition, parents also shared snaps of their children.

ALSO READ: Gauteng woman requests to be Zulu King’s ‘first white Zulu Queen’

‘THIS HISTORIC GESTURE WILL GIVE MEANING AND SYMBOLISM’

Following the circular call, Sadtu responded to the provincial Department of Education on Monday 29 August, News24 reported.

“Honouring our rainbow nation, Heritage Day is often a celebration of inclusivity and diversity across schools. Beyond this, there is no cultural observance within public schools that encourages learners, educators and other education workers to wear specific cultural attire on any other particular day,” said the union.

In response, Frazer said the activity of celebrating King MisuZulu by learners from all backgrounds will play a more significant role in national unity and social cohesion.

“This historic gesture will give meaning and symbolism to a call for a decolonised education in our lifetime as we forge ahead in providing quality education,” the department added.