Eskom boss André de Ruyter taking legal action after threats on social media

Image via: Eskom / Twitter

Eskom boss André de Ruyter taking legal action after threats on social media

Eskom has reportedly confirmed that it would be opening a case of intimidation on behalf of André de Ruyter following social media posts.

Eskom boss André de Ruyter taking legal action after threats on social media

Image via: Eskom / Twitter

Eskom boss André de Ruyter is reportedly taking legal action after receiving threats on social media. 

UH, OH SOMEONE IS IN TROUBLE!

On Wednesday, Eskom spokesperson Sikonathi Mantshantsha reportedly confirmed to News24 that the company would be opening a case of intimidation on behalf of De Ruyter following threatening social media posts. 

According to News24, Mantshantsha said these are incitements to commit violence and crime.

“I don’t know what time our people went to the police station and which police station, but I will find that out,” Mantshantsha said.

He did not say against who Eskom would be opening a case.

BUT WHO SHARED THE NASTY TWEETS? 

On Tuesday, EFF KwaZulu-Natal leader Vusi Khoza called on citizens to find the home addresses of De Ruyter and Public Enterprise Minister Pravin Gordhan.

Khoza tweeted: “This thing of load shedding & @Eskom_SA will only stop when we stand up. Let’s get out there, hunt those useless fools down & moer them. Find out where they stay, their physical address, drag them into the streets & bliksem them. If that’s instigation then so be it.” 

ALSO READ: Breaking: Eskom announces load-shedding move to Stage 2

Khoza has since removed the tweet but replaced it with his response this morning: 

RECENT LOAD SHEDDING EXPLAINED BY ESKOM 

Meanwhile, De Ruyter gave an update on the endless bouts of load shedding on Wednesday afternoon, 10 November 2021.

ALSO READ: ‘They’re not blackouts, it’s load shedding,’ says Eskom CEO De Ruyter

He explained that a blackout occurs when an electricity system is unable to maintain its frequency, leading to the total loss of electricity transmission and distribution capacity. 

Describing the situation at Eskom, Andre De Ruyter compared the troubled parastatal to an old car that needs replacing, as opposed to fixing.

“The question is not how much it will cost to fix Eskom. We need to buy a new car; it just costs too much to fix the old car. This is exactly the opportunity we have with the money made available by COP26. We can access international funding to a lower-carbon economy,” De Ruyter said.

He added that annually, between R10bn and R12bn is required to spend on maintenance. Eskom’s generation feed is on average 41 years old and they now need to introduce additional capacity to make provision for the plants that are reaching the end of life.