Rand Water maintenance

Rand Water’s 53-hour planned maintenance will affect 6 municipalities.
Photo: Pixabay.

Typhoid in Tshwane: ‘No need to panic’ says City

The City of Tshwane said very few cases of typhoid fever have been reported in the metro. It is closely monitoring the situation.

Rand Water maintenance

Rand Water’s 53-hour planned maintenance will affect 6 municipalities.
Photo: Pixabay.

The City of Tshwane assured its residents that very few cases of typhoid fever have been detected in the metro since December 2021. However, the City is closely monitoring the situation. Last week, the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) announced an outbreak of the disease in two provinces.

SEVEN TYPHOID CASES IN TSHWANE

Tshwane MMC for Health Councillor Rina Marx said since December 2021 to February 2022, seven laboratory-confirmed cases of enteric fever, also known as typhoid fever, have been reported to the National Medical Notification system.

“Two of these cases were reported in December 2021, four cases in January 2022 and one in February 2022,” said Marx.

The City of Tshwane said, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), an outbreak is the occurrence of cases beyond what is normally expected and so far, the sporadic typhoid fever cases in Tshwane do not fit the bill.

As previously reported, the head of enteric disease at NICD, Dr Juno Thomas cautioned that the number of reported typhoid fever cases underrepresent the actual number of cases because many healthcare workers do not test for the disease.

SYMPTOMS TO LOOK OUT FOR

Typhoid fever spreads by ingesting contaminated food and water and direct contact between people. It is a notifiable disease and practitioners are obligated to report it to the Department of Health.

The symptoms include an intermitted fever during the first week that becomes more sustained, headaches, body aches and cramps, nausea and vomiting, constipation or diarrhoea. Flu-like symptoms are also likely.

People with symptoms are advised to visit their nearest health facility for investigation, diagnosis and treatment. The disease is treated with antibiotics that should be readily available in all health facilities.

If residents suspect their water has been contaminated, they are advised to boil the water before drinking.

“The City is working with all its relevant stakeholders to monitor the situation and calls for calm as there is no need to panic,” said Marx.